Why don't you know the calendar is indeed old & odd?
 
Why do we let the annual calendar renewal confuse our memory & waste our effort and resource to deal with the annual variations?
 

NexCalendar

(The Natural Extension of the calendar system)
= the First 8 months of 2024
+ the Last 4 months of 2029
+ SEP 1 as the Extra Sunday
+ DEC 31 as the Leap Sunday
It keeps consistent 13 weeks every quarter & still uses the same set of dates and months of the current calendar. People already know how to use it.
Same calendar & same 52 weeks apply to any year. Because of the least subtle change (< 1%), it can be the simplest and seamless calendar upgrade ever.
It is simple, memory friendly, pragmatic, cost saving, and benefiting all people and business.
Indeed, the calendar will be reformed!
 

 

Why calendar upgrade?

How old is the current Gregorian calendar?
It was a reform of the Julian calendar in 1582. It simply has three leap days fewer than the Julian calendar in every 400 years. The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar in 45 BCE.

How odd is the annual calendar renewal?
It is confusing, wasteful and redundant.
 

Unusual Multiple Calendar Versions

Our memory is confused by the multiple calendar versions. Do you know why the current calendar system has 14 calendar versions in use? It is because it needs 7 versions with 365 days for common years and 7 versions with 366 days for leap years. They are swapped annually to keep the right order of weekdays. However, the unusual multiple calendar versions are neither astronomical nor scientific, just complicated. It is ironic that we dogmatically follow and use it.

Extreme Long Calendar Cycle

Why does nobody know that the basic calendar cycle of the Gregorian calendar is 28 years or exact 1,461 weeks long? Moreover, due to three leap days fewer in every 400 years, the complete calendar cycle is 400 years or exact 20,871 weeks long. These general facts were not explained in any textbook, because the extreme long calendar cycle is embarrassingly neither the best nor the most accurate approach but just complicated. The extreme long calendar cycle and the complicated calendar patterns request all people and organizations to handle the clumsy annual differences.

Confusing, Wasteful & Redundant

Many people feel that the calendar looks like incomplete. It has uneven month lengths and it changes annually. The 14 calendar versions and the 400-year long calendar cycle are neither astronomical nor scientific, just complicated and somehow redundant. That happened from the dictated constraint of using the strict 7-day week. "Before the official adoption of the strict 7-day week in 321 CE, the calendar was mixed with 7-day weeks and some 8-day weeks in a much simple pattern." The introduced annual calendar renewal is certainly the worst and most complicated calendar feature. It always confuses our memory & continuously wastes our effort and resource to deal with the annual calendar variations.

14 Calendar versions in

the Gregorian Calendar

28 Years per

Basic calendar cycle

400 Years long per

Complete calendar cycle

20,871 Weeks long per

Complete Calendar cycle

Seamless Calendar Upgrade

There are many proposals of calendar reform. Only NexCalendar introduces the least subtle change. It is the simplest & seamless calendar upgrade ever.

Simply Same Calendar for Any Year

NexCalendar = the First 8 months of 2024 + the Last 4 months of 2029 + September 1 as the Extra Sunday + December 31 as the Leap Sunday. It is a user-friendly perennial calendar. Instead of using 14 calendar versions of the Gregorian calendar, same calendar version for any year is much simple and practical for all people & business.

Since no annual calendar variations, no confusion and wasting will happen again. The majority of holidays and observances without designated dates will be easily fixed on some dates. Annual scheduling is much simplified for all people, business and organizations. Particularly, parents, students, and teachers are very happy to see the school terms and school breaks can fall on the same dates every year.

13 Weeks per Quarter & Same 52 Weeks any Year

NexCalendar can maintain consistent 13 weeks per quarter and the same 52 weeks for any year. February always has 29 days so as to keep the first quarter with 91 days or 13 weeks. Both the third quarter and the fourth quarter have 92 days (or 1 extra day after 13 weeks). September 1 is set as an annual Extra Sunday. It is between the Saturday of August 31 and the Sunday of September 2, which can maintain the third quarter with exact 13 weeks. September 1 was a special day, as it was the New Year's day in some countries and religions. It is the first day of Spring in the Southern Hemisphere. The Extra Sunday could be an extended Sabbath or extra worship day on the first day of the third season.

December 31 is the last day of the year. It is set as the Leap Sunday after the Sunday of December 30 in the Leap Year, which can maintain the fourth quarter with exact 13 weeks. Again, the Leap Sunday could be an extended Sabbath or extra worship day at the end of the 4-year leap cycle.

The consistent calendar structure can make business statistics, periodical analysis, and quarterly forecasts more relevant. For people, it is a no-brainer to instantly work out the weekday of any date. The simple and consistent week system brings great convenience to all people, business and organizations.

From Monday to Sunday in Every Quarter

NexCalendar is naturally and neutrally extended from the current calendar. It is compatible with the current Gregorian calendar and the Julian calendar because they use the same set of dates and months. Only the week system is subtly extended and standardized. Effectively, all quarters can start from Monday and end on Sunday. People can already know how to use the simple and pragmatic NexCalendar without any further explanation.

NexCalendar has the most preferred calendar structure for all people & business. The adoption is certainly super simple, and the transition is seamless as having a regular swap to the next calendar version as usual. Then no further calendar renewal is required as the simple NexCalendar is applicable to any year. Any country can afford this seamless calendar upgrade for the sake of the great benefits to all people, business and organizations.

1 Calendar

Version

4 Years

Leap Cycle

13 Weeks

Per Quarter

52 Weeks

Per Year


New Happy Features

Achieving the least subtle change (< 1%) and seamless transition,
NexCalendar merely introduces three simple and happy features:

Regular February 29

February with 28 days is weird. It should always have 29 days so that the first quarter can have 91 days or 13 weeks.

The Extra Sunday: Sep. 1

September 1 is the annual Extra Sunday on the first day of the third season. It is between Aug 31 (SAT) and Sep 2 (SUN).

The Leap Sunday: Dec. 31

December 31 is the Leap Sunday since the leap day is rationally and bestly set on the last day of the 4-year leap cycle.

NexCalendar with the week presented from Monday:
NexCalendar with the week presented from Sunday:

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Whenever a date is mentioned, we instantly need to know the corresponding weekday. Although we can easily get help from any calendar software or application, the varying weekdays still cause much troubles. It confuses our memory and wastes our effort & resource to deal with the annual calendar variations. Because the varying weekdays are neither astronomical nor scientific, but complicated and somehow redundant, all calendrical research and studies suggest reforming the calendar into a perennial calendar. A perennial calendar is a calendar that applies to any year, keeping the same dates, weekdays and other features. Since no annual calendar variations in the perennial calendar, no confusion and wasting will happen again. It is quite pragmatic, economical and beneficial to all people, business and organizations. For the great contributions, the calendar should eventually be reformed. Thus, there are still many proposals of calendar reform.

  • Yes, since the old and odd issues of the current calendar are affirmed, they will discuss and accept any viable proposal of calendar reform. In 1963 the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican already declared that the Vatican "did not oppose efforts designed to introduce a permanent calendar into civil society." In 1955, the United Nations almost accepted the proposed "World Calendar" but postponed the issue after a veto from the government of the United States. The topic of calendar reform is still being explored and discussed. There are several proposals of calendar reform actively advocating to the public.

  • In June of 1954, the Roman Catholic Church was prepared to collaborate with the United Nations for a reform of the calendar, but there were still some other religious groups opposed the adoption of the proposed "World Calendar". Nowadays, the major challenges of calendar reform should be "the seamless transition and the least transition cost". Without solving these two main concerns, it is not possible for all countries to afford any calendar reform. Currently, all existing proposals tend to introduce a different month system, such as the concept of using "leap weeks" instead of "leap days" or defining 13 months per year (with 28 days per month) instead of 12 months. Any attempt of reforming the month system (i.e. the dates and months) is equivalent to ignoring the thousand years history, culture, traditions, and religious beliefs already blended into the Gregorian calendar. Any change of the existing dates and months is significant and unaffordable. The transition will be extremely complicated and absolutely non-seamless. The transition cost will certainly be unaffordable by countries.

  • The Gregorian calendar kept the same set of dates and months of the Julian calendar with just three leap days fewer in every 400 years. NexCalendar was solely designed to be compatible with both the Gregorian calendar, as well as the Julian calendar. All existing dates and months are also retained. Only the week system is subtly extended and standardized. Everyone will certainly know how to use the familiar NexCalendar. The Extra Sunday and the Leap Sunday are happy features for all people and they are more compliant with the religious practice. Since NexCalendar uses the same set of dates and months, the impact of change is certainly the minimum. All existing birth certificates, identity cards, passports, visas, legal documents, publications, and any documents won't be affected. All history, culture, traditions, and religious beliefs already blended into the existing calendar will be retained.

    Besides benefiting all people, there are significant economic advantages to business and organizations. Particularly, those business statistics, periodical analysis and quarterly forecasts should be more relevant because of the consistent structure of quarters and years in NexCalendar. Moreover, the transition from the Gregorian calendar to the NexCalendar is super simple. It could be equivalent to a regular swap to the next calendar version as usual. While you may think that it is a centennial IT project, the algorithms and programmes are well prepared for seamless software upgrade which assure the software transition can be much simpler and cheaper than the Y2K problem fix. While we can afford the Y2K problem fix, we definitely can afford the upgrade to the NexCalendar system. The transition cost will be the least and affordable by any country. Thus, the adoption of NexCalendar is merely considered as a simple calendar upgrade or calendar extension.

  • NexCalendar supports and follows the International Standard of ISO-8601 that Monday is named as the first day of the week. In fact, the Gregorian calendar was also designed beginning from Monday. On January 1 of 2001, it was Monday. The date was the first day of a new calendar cycle. Although United States, South America, China and some countries show Sunday first in the week, they practically treat every week starting from Monday for work and take rest on Sunday. Certainly, NexCalendar can also be presented with Sunday first. Besides naming in English, the weekdays can be named according to different culture and religions, so that we work on the first 5 days and rest on the last 2 days of the week. Thus, the Islam and Muslim-majority countries can name the days of the week accordingly so that they can pray on the sixth day to the seventh day of the week and may coincide with the working calendars of international financial markets. Furthermore, since Monday to Friday are working days in the major countries, NexCalendar sometimes presents both Saturday and Sunday in red color so as to match the current weekend practice.

  • The leap day is an extra day in the leap year for maintaining the correct average length of the solar year (i.e. the tropical year). Considering that the common year has 365 days and the leap year has 366 days, the difference is one leap day and obviously the leap day is the last day of the leap year. It is also the last day of the 4-year leap cycle. Thus, the leap day should be rationally arranged on the last day of the leap year so that it will not affect the ordinal sequence of any days in the year and through the 4-year leap cycle. February 29 is the leap day because it was supposed to be the last day of the leap year. In the Roman age, the original Roman calendar had ten months only from March to December counting only 304 days (or exact 38 weeks with 8 days per week) per year. It is obviously that September, October, November and December actually mean the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th months from the Latin meaning. And it was reasonable that the year started from the first day of Spring, which was the first day of March. Even the year length was inaccurate, it was a simple and consistent perennial calendar.

    Later, while people had grasped more accurate measure of the year length, January and February were appended as the 11th and 12th months. Thus, the leap day was set on the final day of February because it was considered as the final month. For some reasons, January was officially treated as the first month of the year and then every year oddly begins from the deep Winter. Somehow the leap day was still retained on the final day of February without probably rearranged. We all know that February is weirdly the shortest month in the year with 28 days only. It also causes some issues, such as in the "Day-Count Convention" for finance, accounting and payroll. Thus, NexCalendar maintains February with regular 29 days, which also makes the first quarter having the consistent 13 weeks. December 31 is then set as the Leap Sunday. Since December 31 is part of the double Sundays, people born on December 31 will fairly find no difference to celebrate birthday on the Sunday of December 30 in the common year.

  • Birthday Leave is a common practice in many companies and countries. For people born on a working day, they will be entitled for a paid birthday leave. That makes sure all people may have a birthday off. The policy can even be extended to the spouse or parents, so that they may celebrate birthdays with their spouse or parents. It is easy and feasible to ensure all days are good birthdays. (By the way, the superstition of bad luck Friday 13th does not exist in NexCalendar.) Furthermore, it is also common for people to celebrate birthday in the weekend.

  • NexCalendar is compatible with the current calendar system. The switch between NexCalendar and the Gregorian calendar is super simple. It could be similar to countries with different time zones. It is easy to adopt NexCalendar in any year. For seamless transition and adoption, it will be better to transit in those years starting on Monday, such as 2024 and 2029. There will have 4 years starting on Monday in every 28 years. If the year starting from Monday is a leap year (such as 2024), the first 8 months of NexCalendar will be same as the 8 months of Gregorian calendar (i.e. 66% identical). If the year starting from Monday is a common year (such as 2029), the first 2 months and the last 4 months of NexCalendar will be same as the corresponding 6 months of Gregorian calendar (i.e. 50% identical). If its next year is a common year that starts from Tuesday (such as 2030), the months from March to August of NexCalendar will also be same as the corresponding 6 months of Gregorian calendar (i.e. 50% identical). People will almost find no significant difference during the transition. After the seamless transition, every year will use the same calendar version forever. All people and business will gain the significant benefits from using the simple NexCalendar.

  • In 2018, when I taught my eight years old son about the current calendar system in Auckland, he intuitively asked me several simple questions that I could not answer. Those questions included why February is particularly short, why August is a long month, why we need to renew the calendar every year, and whether the month lengths relate to any astronomical observation. Ironically, those simple questions are not explained in any textbook. Then, I started the research on calendar systems and found out that the design of the Gregorian calendar was neither astronomical nor scientific, but somehow arbitrary. The annual calendar renewal is the worse and most arguable calendar feature, which is annoying and redundant. It confuses our memory and wastes our continuous effort and resource to deal with the annual calendar variations. However, we seem have no choice and just dogmatically follow the Gregorian calendar. In fact, such old and odd calendar system should have been reformed. And there were some trials of using different calendar systems and there were many proposals of calendar reform. All suggested aborting the annual calendar renewal and adopting a perennial calendar system. However, none of them were accepted. Besides the religious concerns, those proposals introduced different month systems that will lead to significant impact of change and enormous transition cost.

    Our calendar system is combined with a month system and a week system. If these two systems are not aligned, annual calendar renewal is required. If they are aligned, it is a perennial calendar system. All proposals focused on revising the month system because of the uneven month lengths, but all troubles actually come from the strict 7-day week. Thus, NexCalendar was designed to adopt the same month system with a subtly extended week system. Having taken two years rigorously design and verified by thousands of people of different ages, religions, and background, NexCalendar was developed to be the most viable solution with the least subtle change. There are just 1% rational and insignificant differences, but the improvement and contributions are forever.

    The two new features of Extra Sunday and Leap Sunday are happy features that can eliminate the annual calendar renewal and maintain the consistent calendar structure with 13 weeks per quarter and same 52 weeks for any year. Still these features are more compliant with the religious practice. In Bible and many religions, there are special eight-day periods, such as Octave and the eighth day sabbath. In history, there were calendars maintaining every month with exact four weeks by the first three weeks with 7 days and the last week with 8 or 9 days. The early Julian calendar also mixed 8-day weeks and 7-day weeks before the official adoption of the strict 7-day week in 321 CE. As the principle design, NexCalendar is compatible with the Gregorian calendar, as well as the Julian calendar, because of using the same set of dates and months. With the simple and consistent structure, NexCalendar can offer the equivalent practical advantages and benefits of other proposals. Only NexCalendar can offer seamless transition with the least transition cost that any countries and organizations can afford it. It is the simplest and most viable calendar upgrade ever.

  • The Gregorian calendar has been adopted as the civil calendar by all countries. It was reformed from the Julian calendar in 45 BCE. The reform retained the same set of dates and months of the Julian calendar. The Gregorian calendar merely removed three leap days from the Julian calendar in every 400 years. Thus, NexCalendar also retains the same set of dates and months of the Gregorian calendar. Only five weeks are subtly extended in every 4-year leap cycle. The least subtle extension can reserve the thousand years history, culture, traditions, and religious beliefs already blended in the calendar. That also represents the highest respect to the religions.

    Concerning the subtly extended week system, 97.6% are normal seven-day weeks. Merely 2.4% are long weeks (5 long weeks out of 208 weeks in 4 years). The long week contains an extra Sunday that religions may arrange extended Sabbaths or extra worship days on the first day of the third season (Spring of the Southern Hemisphere) and at the end of the 4-year leap cycle. That arrangement is the best alignment with astronomical fact that a year has around 365.25 days, in which there have one extra day per year and one extra day per 4-year leap cycle.

    Religions initially believed that "Seven" is the special number arranged for the lunar cycle and the solar cycle. Therefore, months were assigned with around 28 days. Nowadays, we know that the lunar cycle has the average of 29.53 days, which is neither a whole number nor a multiple of seven. The solar cycle has the average of 365.2422 days, which is also neither a whole number nor a multiple of seven. The alignment between the lunar cycle and the solar cycle must take around 19 years, which is not a multiple of seven as well. It means God (the creator of the Universe) never applied the whole number of seven into any cycles. Now, we can preciously measure the cycle of a year. However, due to the ancient belief of the designated multiple of seven, the weird annual variated weeks significantly cause the calendar system over-complicated and confusing. For example, the Easter day falls on Sunday but the date is different every year. It can be in April or in late March. The Christmas day is on December 25 but the day of the week is variated every year. It seems these two important days were inconsistently set by two different religious groups. That were obviously because of the deficiency of the calendar system.

    The seven-day week analogously corresponds to the seven days of creation. But God didn't strictly apply the rule of seven into the lunar and solar cycles. It is controversial that the confusing annual variated weeks may not be the best to meet God's preference. Thus, NexCalendar takes the best compliance to the seven-day week with subtle extension to embed the exact day per year and the extra day per 4-year leap cycle with the concept of Extra Sunday and Leap Sunday. While we check the history, the mix of weeks with 7 and 8 days had been used in the early Julian calendar during the transition from the 8-day week to the strict 7-day week which was before the offical adoption of the strict 7-day week in 321 CE. It means the mixed weeks also existed in the age of Jesus Christ. In the Bible and many religions, there are special eight-day periods, such as the Octave in Christian liturgy and the Eighth day Sabbath. NexCalendar ensures one simple calendar version applicable to any year and benefiting all people and all religions. The precise and consistent days of sabbath in every year plus the reasonable Extra Sunday and Leap Sunday for extended Sabbaths present the higher respect to the religions than using the clumsy annual variated weeks.

  • There are three main challenges while advocating NexCalendar.
    1. People don't know they don't know the annoying issues of the current calendar system. Even we are using the Gregorian calendar daily, only few people aware of the issues because we born to dogmatically use it without choice. The embarrassing facts of the calendar system, the weird design, and the disadvantages are not explained in any textbook. Thus, we generally believe that the varying weekdays of dates are unalterable and normal, but the annual variations are over-complicated and somehow redundant. We need to let people recognize the odd design and the annoying features of the Gregorian calendar ahead of explaining any proposal of calendar reform.

    2. People don't know the calendar can be reformed. Major people think that the current calendar system is much astronomically related and scientifically proven to be effective. They believe the calendar system is unalterable. However, the Gregorian calendar was reformed from the Julian calendar just for changing the date of the Easter as well as improving the incorrect year length. However, the "Reform of the date of the Easter" is still being discussed and the Gregorian calendar is not the most accurate solar calendar system. The Gregorian calendar simply has three leap days fewer than the Julian calendar in every 400 years. Even they are using the same set of dates and months, the calendar cycle of the Julian calendar is 28 years while the calendar cycle of the Gregorian calendar is 400 years long. The Gregorian calendar was not reformed for any astronomical or scientific reason. The reform made the calendar system much complicated that should be corrected and simplified for this modern age. Thus, there are still many proposals of calendar reform.

    3. People don't know the calendar can be seamlessly reformed. People think that whatever reform on the calendar system will be a complicated transition with dramatic impact that no country can afford. However, NexCalendar was designed to achieve the least subtle change, seamless transition, and the lowest transition cost because it uses the same set of dates and months as the current calendar. NexCalendar is the only proposal that is compatible with the current calendar. Furthermore, these two calendar systems can co-exist and inter-convertible. Countries using these two calendar systems will be like countries in different time zones. Besides the seamless transition, the least transaction cost can be insignificant and is affordable by any country and organization.

NexCalendar with the consistent Week Numbers:

Call To Action

It is very challenging to disseminate the message of NexCalendar to all people in the world, we sincerely need your support and sponsor for our advocacy campaigns.

Your Support

NexCalendar was rigorously designed and verified since 2018. During the process, we found that almost no one can explain why and how the current calendar was evolved from and designed for because people dogmatically follow and use the calendar. They certainly don't understand why the calendar should be reformed. Once they know the facts, they will question why we keep using such weird calendar system without any reform.

Please share and discuss the calendar issues with your friends, family members, relatives, neighbours, classmates, and colleagues. Please mention about the proposal of NexCalendar and its great contributions to all human beings. It is the only proposal that can seamlessly upgrade the current calendar into a much practical perennial calendar system. NexCalendar can definitely benefit all people and business. It is super simple, familiar, pragmatic, memory-friendly, and cost-saving.

Your Sponsor

There are several ways to sponsor our advocacy campaigns. You may kindly offer or donate some funding to us so that we can organize more campaigns and advocacy activities. You may sponsor us to make some souvenirs, such as T-shirts or cup mugs. With NexCalendar printed on the T-shirts or cup mugs, the souvenirs can be useful in our whole life because NexCalendar is applicable for every year.

It is certainly very challenging to arrange advocacy campaigns in all countries. Besides using the internet media, we hope NexCalendar can be disseminated and discussed in all schools, universities, associations and organizations. Eventually, the proposal of NexCalendar should be discussed and adopted by countries as the world's civil calendar. Please let us know if you may help us to effectively realize the mission.

NexCalendar presented from Monday with the 4x3 layout:
NexCalendar presented from Sunday with the 4x3 layout: